Principal Investigators

Principal Investigators

Prof. Dr. Immanuel Bloch

E-Mail: immanuel.bloch@mpq.mpg.de

We are carrying out research in the field of quantum optics and quantum many-body systems using ultracold atomic and molecular quantum gases at the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics and the Ludwig-Maximilians University. Furthermore, our group is part of the Munich Quantum Center. [more]

Immanuel Bloch on the MPQ-Harvard Cooperation:

In my opinion the new MPQ-Harvard Research Center Collaborations brings together some of the worldwide leading teams in the field of Quantum Optics, allowing us to address some of the most outstanding question in our field - together! We especially want to extend this collaboration towards the junior researchers, enabling them to form a unique scientific network and being able to work and discuss with leading senior researchers.

Prof. Dr. J. Ignacio Cirac

E-Mail: ignacio.cirac@mpq.mpg.de

In the theory division we investigate new possibilities of controlling the world of atoms, molecules, and photons, and explore how to exploit their quantum mechanical behaviour in order to process and transmit information in more efficient and secure ways. We also develop theoretical tools to describe many-body quantum systems, and participate in the creation of a new theory of information based on quantum mechanics. [more]

Ignacio Cirac on the MPQ-Harvard Cooperation:

The theory departments of Harvard and MPQ have a long-standing collaboration in diverse fields like Quantum Information Theory, Atomic Physics, and Quantum Optics. Presently, they have started some original research programs on Many-Body Quantum Systems where the techniques developed in the the fields of Quantum Information Theory and Condensed Matter Physics at MPQ and Harvard are being combined to address new challenges and describe physical phenomena that was not possible so far.

Prof. Dr. Eugene Demler

E-Mail: demler@physics.harvard.edu

The main focus of Eugene Demler's work has been developing general theoretical tools for understanding the effects of interactions, and establishing a common framework for understanding the physics of strongly correlated systems. Demler's research has addressed various properties of high temperature superconductors, heavy fermion and organic superconductors, quantum Hall systems, and quantum antiferromagnets. Demler's research interests also include mesoscopic superconductivity, magnetic and superconducting proximity effects, understanding the effect of dissipation on quantum phase transitions, and Bose-Einstein condensation of alkali atoms. [more]

Prof. Dr. John Doyle

E-Mail: doyle@physics.harvard.edu

Research is performed in two areas: atomic, molecular and optical and non-accelerator elementary particle physics. Work includes production, trapping and evaporative cooling of ultra-cold molecules and atoms for use in a variety of experiments including studies of collisions, quantum gases, and optical spectroscopy. The work in particle physics centers around the search for the permanent electric dipole moment of the electron, using molecules. [more]

Prof. Dr. Markus Greiner

E-Mail: greiner@physics.harvard.edu

We study ultracold gases loaded into artificial crystals of light known as optical lattices. The behavior of ultracold atoms in optical lattices is similar to that of electrons in solids. Because of that, ultracold atoms can provide clean realizations of models from condensed matter which can be studied in a highly controlled environment. We developed a novel microscopy technique that allows us to image atoms in optical lattices with submicron and single-site optical resolution. Our experiments with bosonic rubidium and fermionic lithium are at the interface of atomic physics, condensed matter physics and quantum information. [more]

 

Prof. Dr. Theodor Hänsch

E-Mail: t.w.haensch@mpq.mpg.de

The Laser Spectroscopy Division of Professor Theodor W. Hänsch is developing tools to observe and manipulate quantum matter with light. Applications range from fundamental physics laws to nanoscopy of condensed matter quantum systems. The research in the Laser Spectroscopy Division is mainly organized along three principal lines: precision spectroscopy of simple atoms; molecular spectroscopy and imaging with laser frequency combs; and quantum optics with optical micro-cavities.[more]

Theodor Hänsch on the MPQ-Harvard Cooperation:

The Max Planck Harvard Research Center for Quantum Optics creates synergies between research teams at both locations with complementary expertise and facilities. We will participate with our work on novel laser spectroscopy of atoms and molecules.

Prof. Dr. Mikhail Lukin

E-Mail: lukin@physics.harvard.edu

Our research focuses on both the theoretical and experimental studies in quantum optics, atomic physics, and quantum information science. The emphasis is on studies of quantum systems consisting of strongly interacting photons, atoms, molecules and electrons. We are developing new techniques for controlling the quantum dynamics of such systems, and studying fundamental physical phenomena associated with them.[more]

Prof. Dr. Kang-Kuen Ni

E-Mail: ni@chemistry.harvard.edu

Our group is working to create molecules at the lowest possible temperatures, and to study their chemical reactions and physical interactions. At such ultra-cold temperatures quantum mechanics describes all aspects of the molecules: their position, orientation, and internal state. In this fascinating regime, new quantum phases emerge, beyond the usual gas, liquid, and solid phase, and even Bose-Einstein condensation. These phases are the subject of many theoretical studies, and now await laboratory demonstration. At ultra-cold temperatures, chemistry is also fully quantum mechanical, and unusual four-center reactions may dominate chemical dynamics. We are embarking to map out this strange new world of ultra-cold quantum chemistry and ultra-cold molecules. The unique properties of molecules also open new research opportunities for quantum information science.[more]

Prof. Dr. Gerhard Rempe

E-Mail: gerhard.rempe@mpq.mpg.de

The Quantum Dynamics Division is well known for its broad range of activities, ranging from atomic to molecular physics, from quantum optics to quantum gases, and from cavity quantum electrodynamics to quantum information science. Dynamical effects occurring in driven dissipative systems play a pivotal role, in particular when the system constituents are strongly coupled to each other.[more]

Prof. Dr. Susanne Yelin

E-Mail: syelin@physics.harvard.edu

Susanne Yelin's research interests are in theoretical quantum optics and quantum information science. Current research directions include quantum control of ultracold polar molecules, investigation of novel coherence-based optical elements, single-photon nonlinear optics using dipolar systems, coherent metamaterials and negative refractivity, coherent control in condensed matter systems, and superradiance.[more]
 
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